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Comparative Study

| Published: June 25, 2018

Cultural Practices of Male Child Preference as a Determinant of Psychological Trauma among Women in South Eastern-Nigeria

Eze Ogbonnia Eze (Ph.D.) ,

Department of Psychology and Sociological Studies, Ebonyi State University, P.M.B 053 Abakaliki, South-Eastern Nigeria Google Scholar More about the auther

Rev. Fr. Kenneth Chigbo (Ph.D.)

Department of Psychology and Sociological Studies, Ebonyi State University, P.M.B 053 Abakaliki, South-Eastern Nigeria Google Scholar More about the auther

DIP: 18.01.070/20180602

DOI:10.25215/0602.070

ABSTRACT

This paper attempted to make a connection between the maladaptive consequences and dangers faced by women in South-Eastern Nigeria who could not give birth to male children of their own. Literature reviewed in the study reveal that male child preference in Igbo tribe in South-Eastern Nigeria is a long held culture and conditioning that has continued to make women look like second class citizens in their own communities. It was evident from the literature that male child preference as a cultural practice leaves women without male children in dangers of losing their self-worth and life meaning. Thus, this paper has examined these literatures and connected the experiences of these women to those of psychological trauma. Informally, some informants were interviewed and their responses in respect to their own conditions of not having male children confirmed the connection made in this study that they experienced conditions that coincide with those of psychological trauma. Conclusions are made that psychological trauma may exist among women in South-Eastern Nigeria who do not have male children. Similarly, recommendations were made some of which included a call for researches to expose that silent-killer cultural practice in Igbo South Eastern Nigeria as a way of reducing the difficulties faced by women in those communities.
Responding Author Information

Eze Ogbonnia Eze (Ph.D.) @ ezeogbonnia@gmail.com

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ISSN 2348-5396

ISSN 2349-3429

DIP: 18.01.070/20180602

DOI:10.25215/0602.070

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Published in   Volume 06, Issue 2, April-June, 2018

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