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Comparative Study

| Published: September 25, 2016

Differential Perception of Problem Behaviors between Parents, Teachers and Therapists

S. Venkatesan

Professor & Head, Department of Clinical Psychology in All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, under Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India, located at Manasagangotri, Mysore, Karnataka, India. Google Scholar More about the auther

, L. Lokesh

Clinical Psychologist-Grade II, Department of Clinical Psychology in All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, under Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India, located at Manasagangotri, Mysore, Karnataka, India Google Scholar More about the auther

DIP: 18.01.118/20160304

DOI: 10.25215/0304.118

ABSTRACT

Background: Identification, listing, and prioritizing problem behaviors, and identification of rewards require unanimity among caregivers for effective management of children. Differential perception between the child handlers can endanger behavior correction program. Method: This cross sectional survey enlists the nature, frequency and intensity of problem behaviors, examines rank order preferences for target setting, and elicits reward preferences as reported separately by 94 father-mother-teacher-therapist caregivers for and on behalf of their 31 children with intellectual/developmental disabilities. Data was collected using standardized problem behavior tool and evocative procedures like open ended interviews and key informant reports. Results: There is greater propensity toward externalizing than internalizing forms of problem behaviors in the children. The point prevalence overall frequency count of problem behaviors per respondent is 20.15 and per child is 15.44. Significant differences and inverse correlations are seen between informants on all aspects of reporting frequency, intensity and/or types of problem behavior, their prioritizing and listing of rewards. Mothers report highest number of problem behaviors in their children compared to teachers, fathers and therapists. The implications of this poor agreement are presented and discussed for optimizing problem behavior remediation programs.

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S. Venkatesan @ lokeshlinfy@rediffmail.com

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Article Overview

ISSN 2348-5396

ISSN 2349-3429

18.01.118/20160304

10.25215/0304.118

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Published in   Volume 03, Issue 4, July-September, 2016