OPEN ACCESS

PEER-REVIEWED

Comparative Study

| Published: May 15, 2017

Effectiveness of Yoga in Patients with Functional Psychotic Disorder

Vandana Patel

Assoc Prof, Humanity department, BBDNITM Lucknow, U.P., India Google Scholar More about the auther

, Sandeep Verma

Assoc Prof, Department of Psychiatry, Mayo Institute Of Medical Science, Barabanki, UP, India Google Scholar More about the auther

DIP: 18.01.055/20170403

DOI: 10.25215/0403.055

ABSTRACT

Background: The application of yoga as a therapeutic intervention, which began early in the twentieth century, takes advantage of the various psychophysiological benefits of the component practices. The physical exercises (asanas) may increase patient’s physical flexibility, coordination, and strength, while the breathing practices and meditation may calm and focus the mind to develop greater awareness and diminish anxiety, and thus result in higher quality of life. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Yoga in patients with functional psychotic disorder. Materials & Methods: 100 patients with a diagnosis of functional non-affective psychosis were involved in the study. They were divided into 2 groups. Group I (Yoga) – It included 50 patients. Group II (Exercise)- It included 50 patients. The severity of clinical state was measured on Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Clinical Global Impression Severity (CGIS). Assessment was performed at the time of starting yoga/exercise as well as 2 and 6 weeks thereafter. At these 3 time points, the extra pyramidal (Parkinsonian) side-effects too were measured using Simpson Angus Scale (SAS). Results: Group I had 25 males and 25 females. Similarly group II had 25 males and 25 females. The difference was non significant (P – 1). College literate in group I was 15, in group II was 9. 22 patients and 23 patients were on second generation antipsychotics in group I and group II respectively. Illness duration was 20.4 years and 24.2 years in group I and group II respectively. Positive syndrome score was 19.2 and 19.1 in group I and group II respectively. Negative syndrome score was 16.8 and 17.1 in group I and group II respectively. General psychopathology score was 25.4 and 26.2 in group I and group II respectively. Total HDRS score was 61.8 and 61.2 in group I and group II respectively. Total HDRS Score was 13.8 and 14.2 in group I and group II respectively. Total SAS score was 3.2 and 3.4 years in group I and group II respectively. The difference was non significant (P > 0.05). CGI illness severity score in group I, at baseline, 2weeks and 6 weeks was 6.04, 4.65 and 3.12 respectively. Similarly in group II, it was 6.18, 5.14 and 3.86 at baseline, 2weeks and 6 weeks respectively. The difference was significant (P < 0.05). Positive syndrome score in group I, at baseline, 2 weeks and 6 weeks was 18.98, 13.84 and 7.8 respectively. Similarly in group II, it was 18.5, 14.82 and 9.22 at baseline, 2 weeks and 6 weeks respectively. The difference was significant (P < 0.05). Negative syndrome score was significantly higher at 6 weeks in group II as compared to group I (P < 0.05). General Psychopathology score was statistical significant at 2 weeks (P < 0.05). Total PANSS score was statistical significant at 2 weeks (P < 0.05). There was statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) in HDRSS score in both groups. At 2 weeks the total SAS score was statistical significant among both groups (P <0.05). Conclusion: Yoga may be beneficial in patients with psychotic disorder. This has additional advantage along with standard pharmacological management. 

Keywords

Responding Author Information

Vandana Patel @ hkps0320@gmail.com

Find On

Article Metrics

ISSN 2348-5396

ISSN 2349-3429

DIP: 18.01.055/20170403

DOI: 10.25215/0403.055

Download: 2

Published in   Volume 04, Issue 3, April-June, 2017

Pin It on Pinterest