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Comparative Study

| Published: December 25, 2015

Impact of Mental wellbeing and Quality of Life on Depression, Anxiety and Stress among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA)

DIP: 18.01.147/20150301

DOI: 10.25215/0301.147

ABSTRACT

Background: People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) manifest a wide range of stress responses ranging from disbelief, denial, fear to extreme conditions of anxiety disorders, depression and even suicidal thoughts. These complications can have a significant impact on daily functioning and greatly diminish quality of life. Mental wellbeing and Quality of Life can help in better management of stress and facilitate adaptive coping among PLWHA. Aim: The research examined the impact of mental wellbeing and Quality of Life on Depression, Anxiety and Stress among people living with HIV/AIDS infection. Research Design: Cross sectional survey design was used. Sample: A sample of 60 people (males and females of equal number) over the age of 18 years and with the diagnosis for HIV/AIDS for more than six months participated in the study. Tools used: To assess the depression, anxiety and stress among PLWHA, DASS scale was used and to assess their psychological wellbeing, Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-Being scale was used. In order to assess their present status of QOL regarding the illness, WHO’s QOL HIV-BREF Scale was used. Results: Majority of the PLWHA had moderate level of anxiety and mild level of depression after being diagnosed. Most of the participants have positive mental well-being and had enhanced quality of life. Conclusion: A direct effect of mental wellbeing has been found on the depression, anxiety and stress among PLWHA indicating that higher the mental wellbeing of the PLWHA, the greater is the likelihood that they do not suffer from depression, exhibit less anxiety and are living a stress free life and vice versa. The study also found direct impact of QOL on psychological distress, depression and anxiety among PLWHA i.e. poor QOL of PLWHA makes them more prone to and vulnerable to stress, depression and anxiety and vice versa.

Responding Author Information

Bhavna Mukund @ bhavna.psy@gmail.com

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ISSN 2348-5396

ISSN 2349-3429

DIP: 18.01.147/20150301

DOI: 10.25215/0301.147

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Published in   Volume 03, Issue 1, October-December, 2015

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