Study of the history and nature of masculinity as a socially constructed concept may not affirm an idea or a definition, but a set of conflicting definitions and images that are consistently changing over time. Research on gender role suggests that the conception of masculinity has evolved over time in response to social and historical events (Brod, 1987; Kimmel, 1987).The visual representations of masculinity in print advertisements have also witnessed variations over time, suggesting shifts in social beliefs about males. This paper aims to understand the transition in the images of masculinity by studying the male representations in old and modern Indian print advertisements. Five advertisements, each from the pre-noughties and post noughties era, were selected, through a hand search of advertisements online, and analysed using semiotic analyses. The findings suggest that there is a visible transition in the idea of what constitutes masculinity. The older advertisements focused on hegemonic representations of masculinity with style, success, and power as being strong indicators of masculinity, whereas the modern advertisements emphasized male bodies, anti-femininity, playboy images and usage of gendered products as signs of masculinity and the achievement of the same.
"> Study of the history and nature of masculinity as a socially constructed concept may not affirm an idea or a definition, but a set of conflicting definitions and images that are consistently changing over time. Research on gender role suggests that the conception of masculinity has evolved over time in response to social and historical events (Brod, 1987; Kimmel, 1987).The visual representations of masculinity in print advertisements have also witnessed variations over time, suggesting shifts in social beliefs about males. This paper aims to understand the transition in the images of masculinity by studying the male representations in old and modern Indian print advertisements. Five advertisements, each from the pre-noughties and post noughties era, were selected, through a hand search of advertisements online, and analysed using semiotic analyses. The findings suggest that there is a visible transition in the idea of what constitutes masculinity. The older advertisements focused on hegemonic representations of masculinity with style, success, and power as being strong indicators of masculinity, whereas the modern advertisements emphasized male bodies, anti-femininity, playboy images and usage of gendered products as signs of masculinity and the achievement of the same.
"> Study of the history and nature of masculinity as a socially constructed concept may not affirm an idea or a definition, but a set of conflicting definitions and images that are consistently changing over time. Research on gender role suggests that the conception of masculinity has evolved over time in response to social and historical events (Brod, 1987; Kimmel, 1987).The visual representations of masculinity in print advertisements have also witnessed variations over time, suggesting shifts in social beliefs about males. This paper aims to understand the transition in the images of masculinity by studying the male representations in old and modern Indian print advertisements. Five advertisements, each from the pre-noughties and post noughties era, were selected, through a hand search of advertisements online, and analysed using semiotic analyses. The findings suggest that there is a visible transition in the idea of what constitutes masculinity. The older advertisements focused on hegemonic representations of masculinity with style, success, and power as being strong indicators of masculinity, whereas the modern advertisements emphasized male bodies, anti-femininity, playboy images and usage of gendered products as signs of masculinity and the achievement of the same.
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| Published: September 25, 2019

Male Representations and Transition in Masculinity: A Semiotic Analysis of Old and Modern Indian Print Advertisements

Parvender Singh Negi

Research Assistant at Department of Psychiatry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India Google Scholar More about the auther

, Megha Mandalaparthy

Research Assistant at iCALL Psychosocial Helpline, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India Google Scholar More about the auther

DIP: 18.01.029/20190703

DOI: 10.25215/0703.029

ABSTRACT

Study of the history and nature of masculinity as a socially constructed concept may not affirm an idea or a definition, but a set of conflicting definitions and images that are consistently changing over time. Research on gender role suggests that the conception of masculinity has evolved over time in response to social and historical events (Brod, 1987; Kimmel, 1987).The visual representations of masculinity in print advertisements have also witnessed variations over time, suggesting shifts in social beliefs about males. This paper aims to understand the transition in the images of masculinity by studying the male representations in old and modern Indian print advertisements. Five advertisements, each from the pre-noughties and post noughties era, were selected, through a hand search of advertisements online, and analysed using semiotic analyses. The findings suggest that there is a visible transition in the idea of what constitutes masculinity. The older advertisements focused on hegemonic representations of masculinity with style, success, and power as being strong indicators of masculinity, whereas the modern advertisements emphasized male bodies, anti-femininity, playboy images and usage of gendered products as signs of masculinity and the achievement of the same.
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Parvender Singh Negi @ negi.parvender03@gmail.com

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ISSN 2348-5396

ISSN 2349-3429

18.01.029/20190703

10.25215/0703.029

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Published in   Volume 07, Issue 3, July-September, 2019