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| Published: September 25, 2017

Problem Behaviours and Associated Factors among Youth in Bangalore City, India

Mrs. Sudha A Rao

Research Scholar in Human Development, Department of Studies in Food Science and Nutrition, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore, India Google Scholar More about the auther

, Dr. Komala M

Senior Assistant Professor of Human Development, Department of Studies in Food Science and Nutrition, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore, India Google Scholar More about the auther

DIP: 18.01.136/20170404

DOI: 10.25215/0404.136

ABSTRACT

Youth is the significant phase of life, characterized by rapid and intense physical, physiological, psychological, behavioral changes with changing patterns of social interactions and relationships. The developmental changes that occur in the transitional period from adolescence to adulthood may cause varying degree of disturbances, resulting in problem behaviours (PB). A cross sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence and association of socio-demographical factors with problem behaviours. The sample comprised of 800 youth both boys and girls of 18 to 24 years of age, drawn randomly from various educational institutions within Bangalore, a capital city of Karnataka state, India. Self-developed questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographical information and Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment-Adult Self-Report for ages 18-59 was administered to assess the problem behaviours. The findings revealed that the prevalence of internalizing problem behaviours (IPB) was found to be 59% whereas the prevalence of externalizing problem behaviours (EPB) was found to be 47% and the prevalence (inclusive of those in the borderline) of overall problem behaviours (OPB) was found to be 25% among youth in Bangalore city. Clinical IPB was most common in boys (43.5%) than girls (32.1%) and significant association was found between genders and internalizing problem behaviours among youth. Comparatively more boys (27.6%) than girls (25.7%) were found to in the clinical level of EPB, but no significant association was found between genders and EPB. Prevalence of clinical IPB, EPB and OPB in youth shows peak around 18-20 years of age (50.5%, 36.4% and 18.7%) followed by steady decline by 22-24 years of age (32.3%, 21.65% and 6.0% ) respectively. Significant association between age groups and IPB, EPB, OPB was observed. Other socio-demographic factors like education, mother tongue, family monthly income were not found to be significantly associated with IPB, EPB and OPB among youth. There is a need for mental health care services to college students to handle the problem behaviours in more effective way and to enhance their quality of life. As preventive strategies, youth need educational awareness on problem behaviours and training in life skills education to understand the situation and to avoid further damage to the learning.

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Mrs. Sudha A Rao @ 22sudharao@gmail.com

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Article Overview

ISSN 2348-5396

ISSN 2349-3429

18.01.136/20170404

10.25215/0404.136

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Published in   Volume 04, Issue 4, July-September, 2017