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| Published: March 31, 2021

Psychosocial adjustment of a child in an institutional care with atypical gender identity development

Lakshmikantham Vidya

PhD. Research Scholar, Dept. of Sports Management and Sports Psychology & Sociology, Tamil Nadu Physical Education and Sports University, Chennai, India. Google Scholar More about the auther

, Ahmed Shahin

Professor, Dept. of Sports Management and Sports Psychology & Sociology, Tamil Nadu Physical Education and Sports University, Chennai, India. Google Scholar More about the auther

DIP: 18.01.135/20210901

DOI: 10.25215/0901.135

ABSTRACT

Adolescence is a phase of significant upheaval in any child’s life. It is more so in this 11-year-old case. Living in institutions implies shared living spaces with many with hardly any personal space to understand and absorb the complex changes happening to her (gender the individual identifies as now). The case study here, attempts to throw light on the complex biological-physical, cognitive, social, and emotional developmental dimensions the child faces. The nature of this study is to bring out the incongruent gender identity of the child diagnosed with gender dysphoria. The emotional distress and confusion experienced when shifted from familiar surroundings to a new place, especially with pubertal physical changes.  The feelings of dysphoria and gender identity issues manifest differently, so different coping skills are very much needed to equip the child in this challenging transformation. The environmental factors such as the primary caregivers, peers, school and media influence the individual in building gender-based attitudes, behaviours and beliefs. The problems faced by the individual concerning the adjustments to make with self, the caregivers and peer need to be addressed. Although gender nonconformity is not a mental disorder, Gender Dysphoria is characterised by clinically significant mental anguish. Persons with Gender Dysphoria often have impaired social and occupational functioning because of the marked difference between their expressed gender and their gender at birth. A provisional support system that encourages the individual self-understanding and better mind-body connections through this self-evolution phase is the key to building self-esteem in these children.

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Lakshmikantham Vidya @ vidyaravikumar@yahoo.co.uk

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Article Overview

ISSN 2348-5396

ISSN 2349-3429

18.01.135/20210901

10.25215/0901.135

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Published in   Volume 09, Issue 1, January-March, 2021