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| Published: March 23, 2021

Side by side in COVID-19: understanding family lockdown experiences through mother’s lens

Nainika Hira

Post-graduate student, Department of Psychology, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India Google Scholar More about the auther

, Dhairya Khurana

Post-graduate student, Department of Psychology, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India Google Scholar More about the auther

, Anushree Lal

Post-graduate student, Department of Psychology, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India Google Scholar More about the auther

, Samreen Rehman

Post-graduate student, School of Human Ecology, Tata Institute of Social Science, Mumbai, India Google Scholar More about the auther

DIP: 18.01.103/20210901

DOI: 10.25215/0901.103

ABSTRACT

Background. With the advent of COVID-19, lockdowns have emerged as effective measures to control the spread of the virus. The present paper analyses the psychological impacts of lockdowns on families by studying the experiences of Indian mothers using the draw and tell method. Method. Twenty-seven mothers from all over India drew ‘Good days’ and ‘Bad days,’ which they experienced during the countrywide lockdown and explained them through an open-ended questionnaire. Results. The drawings were analyzed thematically, resulting in five themes. Mothers’ ‘Good days’ were characterized by positive emotions, family support and bonding, the connective role of technology, and pleasurable activities, while ‘Bad Days’ consisted of high workload, family disputes, lack of communication, and negative media reporting. Findings also revealed that the participants engaged in pandemic-related preventive behaviors and perceived it both as a challenge to be overcome and an opportunity to bond with their families.

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Nainika Hira @ nainikahira@gmail.com

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Article Overview

ISSN 2348-5396

ISSN 2349-3429

18.01.103/20210901

10.25215/0901.103

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Published in   Volume 09, Issue 1, January-March, 2021